Design

One-
page check-
out

The concept of one-page checkout

All of the elements in the design of the checkout process are arranged on one page, thereby eliminating the progress bar and several steps in the usual process. The checkout page is divided into sections, such as personal details, billing details, shipping address, payment method, and shopping-cart summary. 

Upon arriving on the checkout page, the user will see exactly how much information they have to fill in and how much time it will take. This direct, transparent approach — which keeps the user from being surprised with unexpected sections — helps to ensure that the user completes the process.

One Page Checkout - Responsive Checkout

What are the advantages of one-page checkout?

One-page checkout has several advantages:

1. Clarity
The user knows exactly what to do and how much work they will need to put in to complete their order.

2. Speed
The checkout process is undoubtedly faster because pages don’t have to be loaded for each step. Moreover, fields respond to the user’s input in real time (thanks to AJAX), making the process that much more efficient.

3. No distractions
The very limited space forces the designer to focus on the important content and eliminate all distractions for the user. A clean design is critical to the one-page checkout; all required information needs to fit on one screen and still be readable and user-friendly. All information is reduced to the bare minimum, even the header and footer of the page, leaving as much space as possible for the checkout experience.


Make hard decisions easier

Designing a one-page checkout brings an important psychological aspect into play. The very limited space forces the design team to determine what is truly required information and to be as efficient as possible, asking of the user only what is absolutely necessary. 


Links

“Single or Multi-Page Checkout: Which One Is Right for Your Online Store?,” Jimmy Rodriguez
“One-Page Checkouts: The Holy Grail of Checkout Usability?,” Christian Holst
“One-Step Versus Multi-Step Checkout,” Michelle Gerrard

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